Silicon Valley are the real election meddlers

Democrats bent on pushing the disproved Russia hoax accusations against President Trump would better serve the country by tending to real election meddling happening right under our noses, in Silicon Valley.

A big tech industry run by radical left-wing political activists at Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and others are damaging the integrity of our democracy by silencing scores of Conservatives who don’t violate its terms of service — while giving liberal voices unfettered access to millions of voters.

That’s election meddling —and by definition voter suppression — as one major political party is being given a disproportionate advantage online than its counterpart to shape public opinion and sway voters on these monopolistic digital forums where millions get their news.

Social media networks shouldn’t be allowed to block voters from accessing the president’s tweets and posts or other government officials impacting our lives. Nor should they restrict participation in a healthy political debate simply because a liberal content monitor or big tech billionaire executive disagrees with a user’s religious or political beliefs.

That’s discrimination and it’s happening and the bias is real —and outrageous.

Twitter for example recently banned James Woods, an influential conservative with millions of followers. But Twitter allows Hamas accounts supporting the terror organization to remain.

This is not an anomaly. Conservatives are routinely banned and/or shadow banned while left-leaning voices that spew hate, vile graphic images, extreme vulgarity or threats against others go unchecked.

Sunday President Trump tweeted, “Big attacks on Republicans and Conservatives by Social Media. Not good!” Millions of Americans agree, but it’s time for our leaders in Washington to act to preserve the integrity of future elections.

For starters, the government should call hearings and ask big tech programmers under oath if they’re writing code to silence conservatives, pro-lifers and others whose beliefs they dislike on its platforms.

Have them go on the record about their deceptive shadow-banning practices, otherwise known as “down ranking.” Regulators should also haul in the content monitors hired by social media companies and ask who they’re banning and why.

The Federal Election Commission also needs to get out of the broom closet and do its job investigating the impact all this is having on elections.

With the 2020 election fast approaching, the time to act is now.

About Adriana Cohen

Adriana Cohen is host of the “Adriana Cohen Show” heard Wednesdays at noon on Boston Herald Radio. Follow her on Twitter @AdrianaCohen16.